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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
New Technology
Augmented Reality City Table Top – Unity, CityEngine and Vufoira Print E-mail
Wednesday, 24 April 2013 09:00

The Vuforia AR Extension for Unity allows developers to build AR apps using the cross-platform game engine – Unity. Working with both the free and pro versions of Unity, Vuforia is not only free it is also one of the best out there in terms of tracking and image based tagging.

Table Top AR City

Table Top AR City

Running on either iOS/Android or direct via a webcam it allows the integration of other Unity assets into scenes. As such you can create a table top digital city complete with agents all linked to an image based marker and running as a native iOS app:


We will be exploring this further over coming weeks, it opens up a lot of possibilities for augmenting city models (and office desks) with urban data visualisations via custom made iOS/Android apps….

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Trail Rending of Agents with NavMesh, Physics, Unity and CityEngine Print E-mail
Saturday, 20 April 2013 03:05

Combining simple agent based models with physics objects and rendering techniques in a game engine has potential for city wide 3D urban modelling. Traditional techniques often use JAVA based solutions or custom written toolkits with researchers developing their own models. With recent advances in procedural modelling and game engine technology, with the move to real time data feeds and advanced physics engines, there is notable potential.

Trail Render in Unity

Trail Render in Unity

Yesterday’s post on ‘Shortest Path Modelling and NavMesh in Unity and CityEngine‘ explored a simple target/navmesh approach. If you add physics to the target and use the ‘trail rendering’ effects of Unity you can create a dynamic scene with the paths of the agents traced. It is of course exploratory, but the possibilities are intriguing:

The Trail Renderer is simply used to make trails behind objects in the scene as they move about – with the addition of physics the ball reacts to the mesh and the agents are continuously calculating a shortest path. This is computationally intensive so a question remains on the number of agents Unity can handle in a single simulation, we will be exploring this over the coming weeks.

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Trail Rending of Agents with NavMesh, Physics, Unity and CityEngine Print E-mail
Saturday, 20 April 2013 03:05

Combining simple agent based models with physics objects and rendering techniques in a game engine has potential for city wide 3D urban modelling. Traditional techniques often use JAVA based solutions or custom written toolkits with researchers developing their own models. With recent advances in procedural modelling and game engine technology, with the move to real time data feeds and advanced physics engines, there is notable potential.

Trail Render in Unity

Trail Render in Unity

Yesterday’s post on ‘Shortest Path Modelling and NavMesh in Unity and CityEngine‘ explored a simple target/navmesh approach. If you add physics to the target and use the ‘trail rendering’ effects of Unity you can create a dynamic scene with the paths of the agents traced. It is of course exploratory, but the possibilities are intriguing:

The Trail Renderer is simply used to make trails behind objects in the scene as they move about – with the addition of physics the ball reacts to the mesh and the agents are continuously calculating a shortest path. This is computationally intensive so a question remains on the number of agents Unity can handle in a single simulation, we will be exploring this over the coming weeks.

Add a comment
 
Trail Rending of Agents with NavMesh, Physics, Unity and CityEngine Print E-mail
Saturday, 20 April 2013 03:05

Combining simple agent based models with physics objects and rendering techniques in a game engine has potential for city wide 3D urban modelling. Traditional techniques often use JAVA based solutions or custom written toolkits with researchers developing their own models. With recent advances in procedural modelling and game engine technology, with the move to real time data feeds and advanced physics engines, there is notable potential.

Trail Render in Unity

Trail Render in Unity

Yesterday’s post on ‘Shortest Path Modelling and NavMesh in Unity and CityEngine‘ explored a simple target/navmesh approach. If you add physics to the target and use the ‘trail rendering’ effects of Unity you can create a dynamic scene with the paths of the agents traced. It is of course exploratory, but the possibilities are intriguing:

The Trail Renderer is simply used to make trails behind objects in the scene as they move about – with the addition of physics the ball reacts to the mesh and the agents are continuously calculating a shortest path. This is computationally intensive so a question remains on the number of agents Unity can handle in a single simulation, we will be exploring this over the coming weeks.

Add a comment
 
Trail Rending of Agents with NavMesh, Physics, Unity and CityEngine Print E-mail
Saturday, 20 April 2013 03:05

Combining simple agent based models with physics objects and rendering techniques in a game engine has potential for city wide 3D urban modelling. Traditional techniques often use JAVA based solutions or custom written toolkits with researchers developing their own models. With recent advances in procedural modelling and game engine technology, with the move to real time data feeds and advanced physics engines, there is notable potential.

Trail Render in Unity

Trail Render in Unity

Yesterday’s post on ‘Shortest Path Modelling and NavMesh in Unity and CityEngine‘ explored a simple target/navmesh approach. If you add physics to the target and use the ‘trail rendering’ effects of Unity you can create a dynamic scene with the paths of the agents traced. It is of course exploratory, but the possibilities are intriguing:

The Trail Renderer is simply used to make trails behind objects in the scene as they move about – with the addition of physics the ball reacts to the mesh and the agents are continuously calculating a shortest path. This is computationally intensive so a question remains on the number of agents Unity can handle in a single simulation, we will be exploring this over the coming weeks.

Add a comment
 
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