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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
Täby Torg – An Urban Space North of Stockholm Print E-mail
Monday, 11 January 2016 12:35
© Wichmann+BendtsenPOLYFORM: The opening of Täby Torg marks a new chapter in the city of Täby’s history. The center of Täby is a part of the Swedish “Million Programme” which was executed in the 1960’s. The project aimed to build one million apartments to solve a massive housing shortage. The programme was hugely successful at providing […] Add a comment
 
A Temporary Playground Offers “Light Therapy” in Wintry Montreal Print E-mail
Saturday, 09 January 2016 02:37
Impulse / Image © Ulysse Lemerise

Impulse / © Ulysse Lemerise

In winter in the northern hemisphere, night falls early. Way up north in Montreal, Canada, the sun leaves the sky at 4.30. To deal with the onset of winter doldrums, Montreal started Luminothérapie or “Light Therapy,” an innovative public art event that brings light, music, and fun to the streets. In the Place Des Festivals, the feature attraction of this year’s Luminothérapie is Impulse by landscape architecture firm Lateral Office, CS Design, and EGP Group, which features 30 giant, light-filled seesaws, backed by wall-projected video art. It’s a temporary “illuminated playground” for kids and adults.

Impulse / © Ulysse Lemerise

Impulse / © Ulysse Lemerise

 

Impulse / © Ulysse Lemerise

Impulse / © Ulysse Lemerise

Sitting on the ends of the seesaws and kicking off starts the LED light show and sounds. The intensity of the seesawing is reflected by the intensity of the light and tonality of the sounds the structures give off. So the seesaws’ light and sound will differ from player to player. The organizers told Dezeen, “Impulse is an urban installation that renews itself for every different audience. Each person becomes, while on the seesaws, the player of a novel instrument.”

In the same district, nine wall-projected video and sound art pieces are running simultaneously. The pieces show angular architectural forms, pieces of video games, or, simply, bright bands of color, transforming building facades into new nighttime experiences.

Symmetry by Irregular and Mitchell Akiyama / Martine Doyon

Symmetry by Irregular and Mitchell Akiyama / Martine Doyon

Chantal Rossi, Ville de Montréal Associate Councillor Culture, Heritage and Design, told ArchDaily: “Every year, we are eager to give Montrealers a new creative winter experience. Luminothérapie’s public installations transform our relationship with the city, beautify it, and give it a wonderful, friendly touch. Luminothérapie also keeps Montreal shining bright around the world as a hub of interactive art.”

Try out Impulse through the end of January. See more photos.


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Skjervsfossen by Østengen & Bergo Landscape Architects
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Thursday, 07 January 2016 09:29
© Paal HoffØstengen & Bergo Landscape Architects
: Skjervsfossen is situated close to Voss by the former highway connecting east and west of Norway. For decades, the beauty of Skjervsfossen was vanished due to heavy commercial traffic on the highway. It was a roadside waterfall passers noticed as the car was sprinkled. In 2011 a tunnel was built […] Add a comment
 
The Landscape of Pleasure Print E-mail
Tuesday, 05 January 2016 15:05
LA+ Pleasure / LA+

LA+ Pleasure / LA+

A recent New York Times money column encourages financial planning for play. Architect Bjarke Ingels pitches projects of “hedonistic sustainability.” The second issue of LA+, a new journal from University of Pennsylvania’s landscape architecture department, sets aside questions of saving money or the earth to focus exclusively on pleasure for its own sake. What if landscape architects ignored the perils of inundation, extinction, and urban anomie in favor of the pleasures of the flesh? The authors of the short piece, “Why so serious, landscape architecture?,” argue that such pieties help neither the earth nor the profession. The journal’s collection of articles guide us through an alternative landscape of leisure and sensory delight.

To understand why this approach feels so transgressive, we can look back to Ancient Greece and Rome, and the Stoic view of pleasure as “something lowly and servile, feeble and perishable, which has its base and residence in the brothels and drinking houses” (so said Seneca). Yet an article on the urbanism of pleasure in Rome shows, to the contrary, how that city’s landscape developed as a space of leisure as opposed to an arena of virtue. Contributions go on to describe the central role of pleasure to the shaping of cities, from Rome back then to New York, Hong Kong, and Singapore today. They render pleasure as eternally fundamental to the development of urban form and experience, but also as something whose parameters are constantly changing.

But the larger forces behind the evolution of leisure go unexamined here. For example, how have we gone from the rise of pleasure-driving to new designs for a pedestrian-friendly Las Vegas strip?

Las Vegas Street Signs / Stefan Al and Cricket Day

Las Vegas Street Signs / Stefan Al and Cricket Day

Critique is no fun. Yet some contributors hint at the role of pleasure in combating contemporary landscapes of austerity or promoting joyful coexistence. The strongest articles are the historical ones, tracing the linkages between pleasure and the development of Rome, Atlantic City, Las Vegas, and New Orleans. All the landscapes in question here are overwhelmingly urban. The spaces that support our pleasure through extraction—of diamonds or opium poppies—make only a brief appearance. So does the landscape of outer space travel, perhaps pleasure’s final frontier.

In a triumph of pleasure over method, the journal itself takes a wunderkammer approach, more interested in the joy of collecting than in the pursuit of science or editorial logic. LA+ bills itself an interdisciplinary journal of landscape architecture, and indeed, design projects and interviews here share space with articles in fields ranging widely from philosophy to sociology to marketing to neuroscience.

While it is heartening to see such a drive to engage with knowledge beyond the field of landscape architecture, there is little through line from one contribution to the next. A stronger organization could help guide readers and direct a path through such historical, geographical, and disciplinary variety. Issue 3 will be dedicated to “tyranny.” Perhaps the editors will bring an iron hand to their task.

This guest post is by Mariana Mogilevich, a historian of architecture and urbanism, whose research focuses on the design and politics of the public realm.


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Luisenkirchhof III Cemetery by relais Landschaftsarchitekten Print E-mail
Tuesday, 05 January 2016 09:33
© Stefan Müllerrelais Landschaftsarchitekten: The theme of temporality, which is omnipresent in landscape architecture, has a great influence with regard to the way historic cemeteries are dealt with. As great as their significance and effect has been on history, ageing and the preservation of memory, a cemetery’s functionality must also be based on current sepulchral culture and […] Add a comment
 
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Copyright © 2016. Robert Hewitt | Clemson University professor of Landscape Architecture.
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