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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
So You Want to Be a Home Design Show Star? Print E-mail
Monday, 01 December 2014 14:08
curb

Curb Appeal / HGTV

More than 41 million Americans watch home design shows on TV each week. In a wide-ranging panel at the ASLA 2014 Annual Meeting in Denver, Dean Hill, ASLA, greenscreen, moderated a discussion among the stars on camera as well as the executives and producers behind the scenes who make these design docudramas, often set in suburbia, a reality. John Gidding, star of Curb Appeal; Steven Lerner, an executive at HGTV and DIY at Scripps Networks Interactive; Michael Williams, Green Harbor Productions; and Mia Holt, Johlt Productions, offered candid advice for residential landscape architects and designers who want to become a home design show star:

  • It’s getting harder to find fresh talent without experience. If you are looking to star on your own home design show, a sizable number of Facebook and Twitter followers is key.
  • It’s all about how you are on TV, not in person. For those interested, make a video demo. Production companies often cast via Skype.
  • Extroverts do better. A TV show star needs to be comfortable being out there. You must be telegenic.
  • It’s less about expertise than about passion. Passion reads well.
  • Viewers need to trust what a design show host is telling them to do to their home.
  • TV can provide the gift of design. Home design shows offer broad rules and expose people to the design process.
  • Landscape design concepts have to be conveyed in a way that people can easily understand and apply at home. Viewers want something that’s doable, not overly complex or expensive.
  • HGTV and similar networks are for homeowners interested in improving the value of their home. A $1 investment in a residential landscape will result in $1.22 in added value.
  • Before and after shots, showing the transformational effect of design, work best. A highly educational or altruistic approach causes ratings to plummet. People can go on YouTube to find out how to actually implement a technical solution.
  • TV is not reality: a $20,000 project in TV world costs about $100,000 in the real world.
  • To get one 22-minute episode of a home design show, producers will film over 420 hours of video. When editing, production companies look for humor and drama.
  • For landscape architects and designers: it will be hard to keep your business going and have a TV show at the same time, but a show can also help in real world business promotion.
  • Taste is constantly changing. What didn’t work just two years ago may work now. And what works now may not in the future.

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So You Want to Be a Home Design Show Star? Print E-mail
Monday, 01 December 2014 14:08
curb

Curb Appeal / HGTV

More than 41 million Americans watch home design shows on TV each week. In a wide-ranging panel at the ASLA 2014 Annual Meeting in Denver, Dean Hill, ASLA, greenscreen, moderated a discussion among the stars on camera and the executives and producers behind the scenes who make these design docudramas — which are most often set in suburbia — a reality. John Gidding, star of Curb Appeal; Steven Lerner, an executive at HGTV and DIY at Scripps Networks Interactive; Michael Williams, Green Harbor Productions; and Mia Holt, Johlt Productions, offered candid advice for residential landscape architects and designers who want to become a home design show star:

  • It’s getting harder and harder to find fresh new talent without experience. If you are looking to get on a home design show, a sizable number of Facebook and Twitter followers is key.
  • It’s all about how you are on TV, not in person. For those interested, make a video demo. Production companies often cast via Skype.
  • Extroverts do better. A TV show star needs to be comfortable being out there. You must be telegenic.
  • It’s less about expertise than about passion. Passion reads well.
  • Viewers need to trust what a design show host is telling them to do to their home.
  • TV can provide the gift of design. Home design shows offer broad rules and expose people to the design process.
  • Landscape design concepts have to be conveyed in a way that people can easily understand and apply at home. Viewers want something that’s doable, not overly complex or expensive.
  • HGTV and similar networks are for homeowners interested in improving the value of their home. A $1 investment in a residential landscape will result in $1.22 in added value.
  • Before and after shots, showing the transformational effect of design, work best. A highly educational or altruistic approach causes ratings to plummet. People can go on YouTube to find out how to actually implement a technical solution.
  • TV is not reality: a $20,000 project in TV world costs about $100,000 in the real world.
  • To get one 22-minute episode of a home design show, producers will film over 420 hours of video. When editing, production companies look for humor and drama.
  • For landscape architects and designers: it will be hard to keep your business going and have a TV show at the same time. But a TV show can also help in real world business promotion.
  • Taste is constantly changing. What didn’t work just two years ago will work now.

Add a comment
 
So You Want to Be a Home Design Show Star? Print E-mail
Monday, 01 December 2014 14:08
curb

Curb Appeal / HGTV

More than 41 million Americans watch home design shows on TV each week. In a wide-ranging panel at the ASLA 2014 Annual Meeting in Denver, Dean Hill, ASLA, greenscreen, moderated a discussion among the stars on camera and the executives and producers behind the scenes who make these design docudramas — which are most often set in suburbia — a reality. John Gidding, star of Curb Appeal; Steven Lerner, an executive at HGTV and DIY at Scripps Networks Interactive; Michael Williams, Green Harbor Productions; and Mia Holt, Johlt Productions, offered candid advice for residential landscape architects and designers who want to become a home design show star:

  • It’s getting harder and harder to find fresh new talent without experience. If you are looking to get on a home design show, a sizable number of Facebook and Twitter followers is key.
  • It’s all about how you are on TV, not in person. For those interested, make a video demo. Production companies often cast via Skype.
  • Extroverts do better. A TV show star needs to be comfortable being out there. You must be telegenic.
  • It’s less about expertise than about passion. Passion reads well.
  • Viewers need to trust what a design show host is telling them to do to their home.
  • TV can provide the gift of design. Home design shows offer broad rules and expose people to the design process.
  • Landscape design concepts have to be conveyed in a way that people can easily understand and apply at home. Viewers want something that’s doable, not overly complex or expensive.
  • HGTV and similar networks are for homeowners interested in improving the value of their home. A $1 investment in a residential landscape will result in $1.22 in added value.
  • Before and after shots, showing the transformational effect of design, work best. A highly educational or altruistic approach causes ratings to plummet. People can go on YouTube to find out how to actually implement a technical solution.
  • TV is not reality: a $20,000 project in TV world costs about $100,000 in the real world.
  • To get one 22-minute episode of a home design show, producers will film over 420 hours of video. When editing, production companies look for humor and drama.
  • For landscape architects and designers: it will be hard to keep your business going and have a TV show at the same time. But a TV show can also help in real world business promotion.
  • Taste is constantly changing. What didn’t work just two years ago will work now.

Add a comment
 
So You Want to Be a Home Design Show Star? Print E-mail
Monday, 01 December 2014 14:08
curb

Curb Appeal / HGTV

More than 41 million Americans watch home design shows on TV each week. In a wide-ranging panel at the ASLA 2014 Annual Meeting in Denver, Dean Hill, ASLA, greenscreen, moderated a discussion among the stars on camera and the executives and producers behind the scenes who make these design docudramas — which are most often set in suburbia — a reality. John Gidding, star of Curb Appeal; Steven Lerner, an executive at HGTV and DIY at Scripps Networks Interactive; Michael Williams, Green Harbor Productions; and Mia Holt, Johlt Productions, offered candid advice for residential landscape architects and designers who want to become a home design show star:

  • It’s getting harder and harder to find fresh new talent without experience. If you are looking to get on a home design show, a sizable number of Facebook and Twitter followers is key.
  • It’s all about how you are on TV, not in person. For those interested, make a video demo. Production companies often cast via Skype.
  • Extroverts do better. A TV show star needs to be comfortable being out there. You must be telegenic.
  • It’s less about expertise than about passion. Passion reads well.
  • Viewers need to trust what a design show host is telling them to do to their home.
  • TV can provide the gift of design. Home design shows offer broad rules and expose people to the design process.
  • Landscape design concepts have to be conveyed in a way that people can easily understand and apply at home. Viewers want something that’s doable, not overly complex or expensive.
  • HGTV and similar networks are for homeowners interested in improving the value of their home. A $1 investment in a residential landscape will result in $1.22 in added value.
  • Before and after shots, showing the transformational effect of design, work best. A highly educational or altruistic approach causes ratings to plummet. People can go on YouTube to find out how to actually implement a technical solution.
  • TV is not reality: a $20,000 project in TV world costs about $100,000 in the real world.
  • To get one 22-minute episode of a home design show, producers will film over 420 hours of video. When editing, production companies look for humor and drama.
  • For landscape architects and designers: it will be hard to keep your business going and have a TV show at the same time. But a TV show can also help in real world business promotion.
  • Taste is constantly changing. What didn’t work just two years ago will work now.

Add a comment
 
Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (November 16 – 30) Print E-mail
Monday, 01 December 2014 13:24
The playground in Riverstone master-planned community, Big Adventrue Park, incorporates the natural environment as much as possible.

The playground in Riverstone master-planned community, Big Adventure Park, incorporates the natural environment as much as possible. / Houston Chronicle

FIU Students Seek Flooding Solutions if Sea Level Rises Throughout Miami-Dade CountyThe Miami Herald, 11/20/14
FIU professors Marta Canavés and Marilys Nepomechie worked with students for three years to research sea level rise projections at three, four, and six feet, and created models and proposals to keep existing city infrastructure and neighborhoods habitable. The models, designs and collected data are on display at the new Coral Gables Museum exhibit through March 1.”

S.F.’s Newest Public Space Provides Invitation to Sit, LingerThe San Francisco Chronicle, 11/25/14
“The new plaza is a patch of asphalt at Mission Street, closed to cars but with plenty of room for bicycles to coast through, below a gateway-like frame of salvaged wood adorned with hanging rat tail cactus. Its counterpart at Market Street behind the Palace Hotel spent decades as a deliberate green oasis with formal planters, until it declined to the point where now it is hidden behind construction barriers.”

Parks, Playgrounds Get New Attention in Planned CommunitiesThe Houston Chronicle, 11/26/14
“The latest amenity at River­stone creates a shady and colorful play area for families in the Fort Bend County master-planned community. On two acres of land, colorful pathways and play structures are set among the trees and twisting trails.”

A Guide to Denver’s Best Landscaped Spaces, Deep and FreeThe Denver Post, 11/28/14
“None of it got there by accident, as the new ‘What’s Out There Denver’ online guide reminds us in inviting detail. Our natural places were planned by generations of forward-thinking civic leaders and landscape architects who understood how preserved green spaces balance all of the asphalt and concrete of city life.”

New York’s High Line: Why the Floating Promenade Is So PopularThe Washington Post, 11/30/14
“It has become an archetype for cities everywhere craving their own High Line mojo. In Washington, it is the inspiration for a proposed elevated park where the old 11th Street Bridge crossed the Anacostia River and, separately, for a component in the long-range redevelopment of Union Station.”


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Copyright © 2014. Robert Hewitt | Clemson University professor of Landscape Architecture.
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