• Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
The Hidden Currents of the Landscape Print E-mail
Monday, 14 November 2016 16:16
Malven Hills Ley Lines / Wikipedia
Malven Hills Ley Lines / Wikipedia

Chip Sullivan, FASLA, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, believes there are mysteries in our landscapes that defy explanation. In an otherworldly session at the ASLA 2016 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, he bypassed the usual scientific explanations, delving into mythology, mysticism, conspiracies, and irrationality. “Have you been alone in the woods and felt some strange presence? What the hell is that?,” he asked.

Sullivan wants to find out where these ideas about the landscape come from. In the early 1920s in the United Kingdom, amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins came up with the theory of ley lines, which he believed were underlying alignments of landscape forms. And in 1969, author John Mitchell revived the idea in his New Age book The View Over Atlantis, which explored the “hidden currents of the landscape.”

These ideas aren’t new. Chinese Feng Shui practitioners in the East have long associated the landscape with unseen energy flows. In ancient Western mythology, nature’s power has a prominent role. “The woods were once the sacred domain of the gods and goddesses. Apollo had a sacred grove, and Zeus, a prophetic oak.” The Delphic Oracle of ancient Greece sat on a tripod stool over a crack in the earth, “breathing fumes from the earth’s core” when issuing her prophecies. In Ireland, there were sacred wells, which were portals to the underworld. “Today, we throw coins into wishing wells. Why is that?”

Priestess of Delphi (1891) by John Collier / Pinterest
Priestess of Delphi (1891) by John Collier / Pinterest

Like Australian aborigines — with their “dream time that enables them access to a parallel reality” — landscape architects can use dreams to tap into another world of design. For example, Michelangelo apparently came up with his unique steps in the Laurentian Library in Florence in a dream. And Sullivan pointed to surrealist painter Salvador Dalí, who would dream and then quickly paint his visions.

Laurentian steps / ArtTrav
Laurentian steps / ArtTrav

With Robert Hewitt, ASLA, associate professor at Clemson University, Sullivan put together a group design project that unearthed his students’ dreams. He thinks landscape architects can “integrate dreams into the design process.” As an experiment, he asks designers to “put a sketchbook next to your bed and before you go to sleep focus on a a design problem. Upon waking, replay your dream, record the sequence, catalogue ideas.”

The Landscape Imagineer in The Dream Layout / Chip Sullivan
The Landscape Imagineer in The Dream Layout / Chip Sullivan

Landscape architects need to once again connect with the spiritual side, the alchemy of landscape. “Landscape architecture doesn’t turn lead into gold, but it’s the ultimate transmutation of one element into another.” With nature as a guide, landscape architects can make their studios like an alchemist’s library, divining new ways to “sublimate, bio-remediate, and distill” natural elements into new forms and substances.

Like Voodoo priests in Haiti, landscape architects can “use the genius loci, the spirit of a place,” to maximum effect. For example, he believes the crescent shape of the Mississippi River in the New Orleans delta is a sort of amplifying device, like out of Ghostbusters. “There is a reason deltas are a symbol in alchemy. They are the birthplaces of civilization.”

And he then expanded his discussion to the powerful role mythological figures can play in landscapes, given they are an ever-present undercurrent. In the early renaissance-era Nymphaeum of Italy “woodland deities were brought out into the landscape.”

Nymphaeum at Villa Litta Lainate / Italy Creative
Nymphaeum at Villa Litta Lainate / Italy Creative

Muses can be brought back to play a modern role in linking the conscious and subconscious. Today, “we need to put gods and goddesses back into the landscape. Where is the spiritual aspect?”


Add a comment
 
Landscape And The Art of Survival Print E-mail
Monday, 14 November 2016 10:56
FOTO1_c_Udo_Weilacher_1024x576TUM’s landscape architecture program has historically had an excellent reputation for training young professionals. The holistic education, the multidisciplinary, project-based training and the mandatory international experience have made this program unique ... Add a comment
 
Beiqijia Technology Business District by Martha Schwartz Partners Print E-mail
Monday, 14 November 2016 09:12
© MSPMartha Schwartz Partners (MSP), an award-winning landscape architecture firm with more than 35 years of global experience, has just announced completion of a 60 hectare LEED Gold project candidate located in the Beiqijia Technology Business District of the Changping district north of Beijing, China. Commissioned by Beijing Ningke Real Estate, the forward-looking mixed-use development is […] Add a comment
 
New Ludgate by Gustafson Porter Print E-mail
Thursday, 10 November 2016 08:05
223OBR_N542-0Gustafson Porter: At ground level, Gustafson Porter’s landscape design for the public realm at New Ludgate seeks to tie the new development seamlessly into the surrounding urban fabric and character. This is achieved by fine landscape details and finishes which reinforce the smooth transition and facilitate the use of this new public space in a […] Add a comment
 
New Ludgate by Gustafson Porter Print E-mail
Thursday, 10 November 2016 08:05
223OBR_N542-0Gustafson Porter: At ground level, Gustafson Porter’s landscape design for the public realm at New Ludgate seeks to tie the new development seamlessly into the surrounding urban fabric and character. This is achieved by fine landscape details and finishes which reinforce the smooth transition and facilitate the use of this new public space in a […] Add a comment
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 7 of 956
Copyright © 2016. Robert Hewitt | Clemson University professor of Landscape Architecture.
S5 Logo