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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
What Problem Would You Solve with $100 Million? Print E-mail
Monday, 06 June 2016 14:01

The MacArthur Foundation, creators of the “genius” grant, have just launched 100&Change, a competition for a single $100 million grant that can make “measurable progress towards solving a significant problem.” The MacArthur Foundation seeks a bold proposal with a charitable purpose focused on any critical issue facing people, places, or the environment. Proposals must be “meaningful, verifiable, durable, and feasible.” The goal is to identify issues that are solvable.

The MacArthur Foundation expects to receive applications mostly focused on domestic American issues, but they welcome international proposals as well.

Cecilia Conrad, MacArthur’s managing director leading the competition, told The Washington Post that the grant competition is designed to inspire more creative problem solving. “We believe there are solutions to problems out there that $100 million might be able to make significant headway or unlock resources, and we want to hear what those are. By focusing on solutions, we can inspire people to focus on problems that can be solved, and we just have to roll up our sleeves and get to it.”

Register your proposal by September 2, 2016. According to the foundation, semi-finalists will be announced in December and finalists in the summer of 2017. The foundation’s board of directors will pick the winner.

In other competition news: AECOM, the Van Alen Institute, and 100 Resilient Cities have announced the latest Urban SOS, an annual student competition. Fair Share will explore the principles of the “sharing economy,” and how it can be applied to “support more equitable access to resources, improve the built environment, and enrich the quality of life of urban residents.” Fair Share is looking for multidisciplinary teams of students “to create a new generation of digital innovations combined with physical design strategies to improve how cities provide housing, open space, transportation, jobs, care, and many other services and resources.” Register by June 14 and submit proposals by September 12, 2016. Winners will receive $15,000 and up to $25,000 in services to support the implementation of the winning concept.


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What Problem Would You Solve with $100 Million? Print E-mail
Monday, 06 June 2016 14:01

The MacArthur Foundation, creators of the “genius” grant, have just launched 100&Change, a competition for a single $100 million grant that can make “measurable progress towards solving a significant problem.” The MacArthur Foundation seeks a bold proposal with a charitable purpose focused on any critical issue facing people, places, or the environment. Proposals must be “meaningful, verifiable, durable, and feasible.” The goal is to identify issues that are solvable.

The MacArthur Foundation expects to receive applications mostly focused on domestic American issues, but they welcome international proposals as well.

Cecilia Conrad, MacArthur’s managing director leading the competition, told The Washington Post that the grant competition is designed to inspire more creative problem solving. “We believe there are solutions to problems out there that $100 million might be able to make significant headway or unlock resources, and we want to hear what those are. By focusing on solutions, we can inspire people to focus on problems that can be solved, and we just have to roll up our sleeves and get to it.”

Register your proposal by September 2, 2016. According to the foundation, semi-finalists will be announced in December and finalists in the summer of 2017. The foundation’s board of directors will pick the winner.

In other competition news: AECOM, the Van Alen Institute, and 100 Resilient Cities have announced the latest Urban SOS, an annual student competition. Fair Share will explore the principles of the “sharing economy,” and how it can be applied to “support more equitable access to resources, improve the built environment, and enrich the quality of life of urban residents.” Fair Share is looking for multidisciplinary teams of students “to create a new generation of digital innovations combined with physical design strategies to improve how cities provide housing, open space, transportation, jobs, care, and many other services and resources.” Register by June 14 and submit proposals by September 12, 2016. Winners will receive $15,000 and up to $25,000 in services to support the implementation of the winning concept.


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Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (May 16 – 31) Print E-mail
Monday, 06 June 2016 13:08
Capture
NYC park overhaul / Chang W. Lee, The New York Times

Meet the Garden Designer Who Transformed Rio de Janeiro Wired, 5/18/16
“’You can’t talk about Rio de Janeiro without talking about Burle Marx,’ says Claudia Nahson, a curator at the Jewish Museum in New York City. ‘He shaped the city with public works.’”

The Hudson River Will Soon Have New Look as Construction Begins on Thomas Heatherwick’s Pier 55 Architectural Digest, 5/19/16
“The look of New York City’s waterfront—all 520 miles of it—has been steadily changing over the past few decades, with gritty industrial strips being transformed into recreational landscapes.”

Sites of Demolished Detroit Homes Used to Soak Up Water The Detroit News, 5/19/16
“But Detroit’s water department and Land Bank Authority as well as the University of Michigan turned four vacant city lots into gardens designed to corral stormwater.”

Park Designer Brought People to St. Paul’s Riversides The Washington Times, 5/23/16
“Driving down St. Paul’s Shepard Road, Jody Martinez glances to her left: houses. And to her right: the parks she’s been designing for nearly 40 years. Beyond that, the river; always the river.”

Overhauling 8 Parks, New York Seeks to Create More Inviting Spaces The New York Times, 5/24/16
“On Tuesday, the city announced that eight parks will undergo ambitious face-lifts that are about more than just rehabilitation — it is a plan that represents an evolution, officials said, in New York’s approach to parks by making these public spaces blend better and be more welcoming to their neighborhoods.”

The National Parks Have Never Been More PopularFiveThirtyEight, 5/25/16
“As the National Park Service prepares to celebrate its centennial in August, the national parks have never been more popular.”

The Best Landscape Designs Don’t Require Hours of Watering and Maintenance The Washington Post, 5/26/16
“Pity the poor yard. It receives constant care and attention during the spring and summer, but let a few dry spells or heavy downpours mar its beauty and efficiency and suddenly it’s the bad guy.”


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Clementwijk Sint-Niklaas by Sweco Belgium Print E-mail
Monday, 06 June 2016 07:11
Clementwijk-residental-park-00Sweco Belgium: The Clementwijk district is being extended with a sustainable green residential area. The district will offer accommodation for 700 dwellings – a mix of different dwelling types for different groups of residents – and a natural and adventurous district park of four hectares. The scenic qualities, a strong canal structure and for the […] Add a comment
 
Wulaba Park by Sturt Noble Associates Print E-mail
Wednesday, 01 June 2016 08:54
Wulaba-Playground-00Sturt Noble Associates: The design for Wulaba Park creates distinctive and memorable play spaces. A custom designed play tower referencing the classic Hills Rockets of parks gone by, and a raised fort landing incorporates multiple play experiences and is the key visual element/ attractor in the park. This unique play structure is designed to enhance […] Add a comment
 
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Copyright © 2016. Robert Hewitt | Clemson University professor of Landscape Architecture.
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