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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
HASSELL to design high street public realm proposals for Croydon Council Print E-mail
Thursday, 07 March 2013 00:00


HASSELL, in collaboration with We Made That, has been appointed by London Borough of Croydon to deliver an important public realm project as part of the Connected Croydon programme. Supported by Engineers Buro Happold and graphic designers, Objectif, the team will deliver the South End Public Realm, part of a coordinated set of projects to enhance Croydon’s high streets.

The £2.8m South End scheme will transform the streetscape of a key gateway into central Croydon – and the heart of the Borough’s restaurant district – to create a coherent, high
quality and welcoming place. Works are expected to start on site in early 2014 following extensive engagement and consultation with stakeholders and community groups.

“This is a fantastic opportunity for the team to demonstrate our skills and enthusiasm for improving the public realm. We will working closely with residents and traders to realise their ambitions for this vibrant stretch of high street, all in the context of Croydon’s plans to transform the city centre.” Jon Hazelwood, Head of Landscape Architecture for HASSELL in the UK

“Our approach will address both physical improvements to streetscape and building frontages, and also go further by purposefully activating and promoting the area to contribute to perceptual change in those who live in and visit the area. We’ll be thinking about how different activities can shape our high streets and how we make South End High Street a place where social and civic functions attract commerce and activity.” | Holly Lewis, Partner at We Made That

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HASSELL to design high street public realm proposals for Croydon Council Print E-mail
Thursday, 07 March 2013 00:00


HASSELL, in collaboration with We Made That, has been appointed by London Borough of Croydon to deliver an important public realm project as part of the Connected Croydon programme. Supported by Engineers Buro Happold and graphic designers, Objectif, the team will deliver the South End Public Realm, part of a coordinated set of projects to enhance Croydon’s high streets.

The £2.8m South End scheme will transform the streetscape of a key gateway into central Croydon – and the heart of the Borough’s restaurant district – to create a coherent, high
quality and welcoming place. Works are expected to start on site in early 2014 following extensive engagement and consultation with stakeholders and community groups.

“This is a fantastic opportunity for the team to demonstrate our skills and enthusiasm for improving the public realm. We will working closely with residents and traders to realise their ambitions for this vibrant stretch of high street, all in the context of Croydon’s plans to transform the city centre.” Jon Hazelwood, Head of Landscape Architecture for HASSELL in the UK

“Our approach will address both physical improvements to streetscape and building frontages, and also go further by purposefully activating and promoting the area to contribute to perceptual change in those who live in and visit the area. We’ll be thinking about how different activities can shape our high streets and how we make South End High Street a place where social and civic functions attract commerce and activity.” | Holly Lewis, Partner at We Made That

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Landscape Institute President | “…water should be a priority…” Print E-mail
Wednesday, 06 March 2013 01:17

London Wetlands Park | Image Flickr User amandabhslater

Sue Illman, President of the Landscape Institute, wants the UK’s water supply chain to become more sustainable with priority given to all elements of the water cycle when designing and developing new places. Illman will speak this week at Ecobuild about water sensitive design – a fully integrated solution to flooding, droughts and water quality, the  multi-faceted benefits of sustainable drainage and a green infrastructure approach to development.

“It’s time we started to see water as a potential resource – rather than something to be hidden away underground.  Elsewhere in the world a mixed green, grey and blue infrastructure is being adopted.  In February the White House committed the US to taking a GI approach after some years monitoring its effectiveness, and in Melbourne, Australia the City is introducing legislation to ensure it owns all of the rain falling on the City as part of their Water Sensitive approach, as it sees it as a valuable resource.” - Sue Illman, President of the Landscape Institute

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User amandabhslater – Amanda Slater

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Tanner Springs Park by Atelier Dreiseitl Print E-mail
Wednesday, 06 March 2013 00:16
06_this-is-tsp_c-Dreiseitl

Partner in Charge: Herbert Dreiseitl
Project Landscape Architect: Gerhard Hauber
Project Engineer: Stefan Brückmann
Project … ...Read the rest

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ASLA Celebrates Women’s History Month Print E-mail
Tuesday, 05 March 2013 16:30

farrand
In commemoration of National Women’s History Month, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) honors the women who made important contributions to the development of the landscape architecture profession in the United States. Women have been active in ASLA since its formation in 1899 and have played major roles in its governance and membership. Renowned American landscape architect Beatrix Jones Farrand was one of the 11 founding members. Female membership in ASLA has grown from 15 in 1899 to 5,301 today.

While by no means comprehensive, the following list features several women landscape architects who were pioneers in their field:

Beatrix Jones Farrand (1872-1959) – American landscape architect (“landscape gardener” by her reference) trained at the Arnold Arboretum in Massachusetts. She was a founding member of ASLA and is known for her work on the Yale University quadrangles and the grounds of Dumbarton Oaks (and the neighboring naturalistic Dumbarton Oaks Park) in Washington, D.C. (See her above and her work below).

dumbarton
coffin
Marian Cruger Coffin (1876-1951) – American landscape architect, writer, and lecturer who designed numerous projects on the East Coast. She is known for her work on the gardens of Winterthur, gardens for the New York Botanical Garden, and landscapes for such schools as the University of Delaware. She was elected as an ASLA Fellow in 1918.

winterthur
shipman
Ellen Biddle Shipman (1869-1950) – American landscape architect named “dean of American women Landscape Architects” by House and Garden in 1933. Her notable projects included Longue Vue Gardens in New Orleans, the Cummer Estate (now the Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens in Jacksonville, Florida), and Stan Hywet Hall in Akron, Ohio.

shipman
Annette Hoyt Flanders (1887-1946) – American landscape architect, writer, and lecturer who established a major practice in the Midwest. Her work ranged from institutions to small gardens throughout the United States and included the Phipps Estate, the Morven Farm Gardens, and the McCann Estate French Gardens. She was elected as an ASLA Fellow in 1942.

manor
Marjorie Sewell Cautley (1891-1954) – American landscape architect, writer, and lecturer known for her use of native plants and community design projects for middle-class families. Her best known work included four garden city projects in the New York metropolitan area: Sunnyside in Queens, Radburn in New Jersey, Phipps Garden Apartments adjacent to the Sunnyside community, and Hillside Homes in Brooklyn.

cautley1
Martha Brookes Hutcheson (1871–1959) – American landscape architect, writer, and lecturer who advocated for the landscape architecture profession. She opened her practice in Boston in 1902 and some of her projects included large residential estates, farms, and private gardens in New England and New Jersey. She was elected as an ASLA Fellow in 1942.

cautley
To learn more about the women important to the development of landscape architecture, check out Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes by Judith Tankard; Unbounded Practice: Women and Landscape Architecture in the Early Twentieth Centuryce by Thaisa Way, ASLA; Women in Landscape Architecture: Essays on History and Practice by Louise Mozingo, ASLA, and Linda Jewell, FASLA; and Women, Design, and The Cambridge School by Dorothy May Anderson. Also, members can explore the activities of ASLA’s Women in Landscape Architecture Professional Practice Network (PPN).

This guest post is by Karen Trimbath, ASLA Public Relations Manager

Image credits: (1) Beatrix Farrand / Beatrix Jones Farrand Collection (1955-2) Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley, (2) Dumbarton Oaks / Jared Green, ASLA, (3) Marian Cruger Coffin / The Wintherthur Library, (4) Wintherthur / Winterthur Museum, (5) Ellen Biddle Shipman / Stan Hywet Hall & Garden, (6) Moonlight Garden / Shipman, (7) Cloverly Mann / McIntosh, (8) Sunnyside Gardens / TCLF, (9) Maudsley State Park Garden / The Grog


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