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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
Artists Project Themselves on the Landscape Print E-mail
Tuesday, 19 February 2013 13:59

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Since coming across the work of artist Jim Sanborn, who beams bold geometric shapes against the desert out west, we’ve seen more artists projecting themselves on landscapes — both urban and natural. By altering the backdrop with their light projections, they are creating new works, however momentary.

According to This Is Colossal, a great art and design blog, French artist Clement Briend recently traveled to Cambodia, where he photographed sculptures of Cambodian deities and projected them on urban trees.

On his work, Cambodian Trees, Briend writes: “Cambodian culture is inhabited by a deep spirituality. Their world is inhabited by spirits. In this landscape, a city asleep at night reveals divine figures on trees, allowing their incarnation. At night, we can touch the magic that illuminates Cambodians’ view of the world.”

cam2
Briend uses “homemade prototypes” to project his massive-scale images. He says his photographs “match reality and projection, space and surface. They aren’t flat representation of things, but a mirror of our minds.” The projections themselves almost seem perfectly designed for their arboreal manifestation: What would appear flat projected against a wall becomes amazingly voluminous against trees.

cam3
Other artists are continuing to project themselves in natural settings. Like Sanborn, another artist, Javier Riera, is beaming wild geometric patterns onto landscape scenes. Unlike Sanborn, he’s using spiral or circular patterns.

riera3
Out in the woods, the blog, Beautiful Decay, says Riera’s pieces “distort perception.”

riera2
Riera is creating images not unlike Briend’s: they also look like they could have been made by some forest deity.

new_riera
Lastly, an artistic projection — an installation in Rekyavik, Iceland — by architect Marcos Zotes is called [E]mission. Zotes sees CCTV cameras and people, instead of urban trees or the forest, as the landscape that needs to be lit. He writes: “Surveillance cameras are today a common feature in any urban setting. These mechanisms of control have become so much part of our everyday life, that in a way they have become invisible to us, even if their presence is apparent everywhere. We are constantly being watched and we no longer care.”

emission2
Marcos Zotes’ work uses a projector and sensor to change the way we perceive a CCTV camera. “Every time a person passes by, the projector illuminates the camera and the building where it is attached, defining its field of vision. The space also acquires a theatrical quality; it becomes a stage, in which anonymous citizens are made aware of their role in the urban play of the city.”

emission1
Image credits: (1-3) Clement Briend, (4-6) Javier Riera, (7-8) Marcos Zotes


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Artists Project Themselves on the Landscape Print E-mail
Tuesday, 19 February 2013 13:59

cam1
Since coming across the work of artist Jim Sanborn, who beams bold geometric shapes against the desert out west, we’ve seen more artists projecting themselves on landscapes — both urban and natural. By altering the backdrop with their light projections, they are creating new works, however momentary.

According to This Is Colossal, a great art and design blog, French artist Clement Briend recently traveled to Cambodia, where he photographed sculptures of Cambodian deities and projected them on urban trees.

On his work, Cambodian Trees, Briend writes: “Cambodian culture is inhabited by a deep spirituality. Their world is inhabited by spirits. In this landscape, a city asleep at night reveals divine figures on trees, allowing their incarnation. At night, we can touch the magic that illuminates Cambodians’ view of the world.”

cam2
Briend uses “homemade prototypes” to project his massive-scale images. He says his photographs “match reality and projection, space and surface. They aren’t flat representation of things, but a mirror of our minds.” The projections themselves almost seem perfectly designed for their arboreal manifestation: What would appear flat projected against a wall becomes amazingly voluminous against trees.

cam3
Other artists are continuing to project themselves in natural settings. Like Sanborn, another artist, Javier Riera, is beaming wild geometric patterns onto landscape scenes. Unlike Sanborn, he’s using spiral or circular patterns.

riera3
Out in the woods, the blog, Beautiful Decay, says Riera’s pieces “distort perception.”

riera2
Riera is creating images not unlike Briend’s: they also look like they could have been made by some forest deity.

new_riera
Lastly, an artistic projection — an installation in Rekyavik, Iceland — by architect Marcos Zotes is called [E]mission. Zotes sees CCTV cameras and people, instead of urban trees or the forest, as the landscape that needs to be lit. He writes: “Surveillance cameras are today a common feature in any urban setting. These mechanisms of control have become so much part of our everyday life, that in a way they have become invisible to us, even if their presence is apparent everywhere. We are constantly being watched and we no longer care.”

emission2
Marcos Zotes’ work uses a projector and sensor to change the way we perceive a CCTV camera. “Every time a person passes by, the projector illuminates the camera and the building where it is attached, defining its field of vision. The space also acquires a theatrical quality; it becomes a stage, in which anonymous citizens are made aware of their role in the urban play of the city.”

emission1
Image credits: (1-3) Clement Briend, (4-6) Javier Riera, (7-8) Marcos Zotes


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VIDEOS | Design Adds Value to the Commons Print E-mail
Tuesday, 19 February 2013 05:45

Design Adds Value to the Commons – Michael Speaks, Dean, University of Kentucky College of Design from UK/CoD on Vimeo.

Design Adds Value to the Commons was a design symposium hosted by The University of Kentucky College of Design in conjunction with Lexington’s Downtown Development Authority’s Town Branch Commons Design Competition. Design Adds Value to the Commons was five landscape architects discussing the importance of good design for downtown development and including presentations by
Mark Johnson of Civitas, Shane Coen of Coen+Partners, Petra Blaisse of Inside Outside, Julien de Smedt & Diana Balmori of JDS Architects/Balmori Associates and Kate Orff of Scape


They addressed a crowd of over two hundred students, faculty, city officials, industry professionals and members of the public at the Lexington Children’s Theatre. The discussion was be moderated by Michael Speaks, Dean of the College of Design, and features Aaron Betsky, director of the Cincinnati Art Museum, and Bradford McKee, editor of Landscape Architecture magazine.

You can view all the videos on Vimeo at Design Adds Value to the Commons Channel

Design Adds Value to the Commons – Kate Orff, SCAPE/LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, New York from UK/CoD on Vimeo.

Text excerpts from Watch Videos – UKCoD

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Forum Homini Boutique Hotel by GREENinc Print E-mail
Tuesday, 19 February 2013 00:14
GREENinc-Forum-Homini-1

Project title: Forum Homini Boutique Hotel
Landscape Architect: GREENinc
Location: Cradle of Humankind, Gauteng, South … ...Read the rest

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Sri Kumaran’s Children Home and Education Council | Bangalore India | Integrated Design (INDE) Print E-mail
Monday, 18 February 2013 11:48

Sri Kumaran's Children Home and Education Council | Bangalore India | Integrated Design (INDE)
An Institutional Development that demonstrates sustainable ecological landscape development through the use of water management, ecological landscapes, use of natural and local materials, use of native biodiversity, etc, resulting in substantial savings in water use and maintenance.

Sri Kumaran's Children Home and Education Council | Bangalore India | Integrated Design (INDE)
The landscape system employs features for microclimate control, water management and risk mitigation, propagation of native biodiversity, integration of non-motorized mobility systems, etc. The proposal includes integration of built and open elements of the institutional campus with specific attention paid to the demands of the geography.
Sri Kumaran's Children Home and Education Council | Bangalore India | Integrated Design (INDE)

The varied nature of designed spaces help address the large spectrum of user groups (children aged 6-18) by accommodating recreational activities that are passive design in nature negating the use of concrete and other industrial materials. Each part of the designed landscape is also tailored to function as an educative space for natural sciences.

Sri Kumaran's Children Home and Education Council | Bangalore India | Integrated Design (INDE)
Sri Kumaran's Children Home and Education Council | Bangalore India | Integrated Design (INDE)

Sri Kumaran’s Children Home and Education Council | Bangalore India | Integrated Design (INDE)

Client | Sri Kumaran’s Children Home and Education Council
Area | 28 acres

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