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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
Aqua Magica Park by Agence Ter Print E-mail
Sunday, 23 October 2011 11:52

Design Team: Agence Ter Landscape Architects
Project: Park setting for regional garden show...Read the rest

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2011 IFLA World Congress | Interview with Bruno Marques, organizer of EFLA Regional Congress Print E-mail
Sunday, 23 October 2011 07:48
Laure Aubert is a landscape architect working in Germany who attended the 2011 IFLA Congress in Zurich. Laure interviewed various Congress attendees which we will feature over the next two weeks. Bruno Marques is responsible organizer of the upcoming EFLA Regional Congress “Mind the Gap. Landscapes for a New Era”.and answers on behalf the Estonian Landscape [...] → Continue Reading 2011 IFLA World Congress | Interview with Bruno Marques, organizer of EFLA Regional Congress Add a comment
 
Gardner Museum Fellowship Print E-mail
Friday, 21 October 2011 11:11
An interesting opportunity for the Gardner Museum Fellowship in Landscape Studies for 2012, which is open to a broad definition of "...an emerging design talent whose work articulates the potential for landscape as a medium of design in the public realm. This new initiative is intended to recognize and foster emerging design talent from across the design disciplines whose work embodies the potentials for landscape as a medium of public works."



Check out the all-star jury that will review applications, under the guidance of Charles Waldheim, Consulting Curator of Landscape, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

Julie Bargmann, University of Virginia
Alan Berger, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Anita Berrizbeitia, Harvard University
Julia Czerniak, Syracuse University
Walter Hood, University of California, Berkeley
Anuradha Mathur, University of Pennsylvania
Jane Wolff, University of Toronto

Start working today, as deadlines are due December 15th.
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Review: NACTO’s New Urban Bikeway Design Guide Print E-mail
Friday, 21 October 2011 09:54


In an effort to create Complete Streets that are also safer for bicyclists, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) announced the release of a new Urban Design Bikeway Guide last week. At the report launch, Janette Sadik-Khan, NACTO president and NYC Transportation Commissioner, Ray LaHood, U.S. Transportation Secretary, and Congressman Earl Blumenauer all emphasized that smart bicycle infrastructure design can not only make roadways safer for all, but can also boost economic growth, reports EMBARQ’s The City Fix

According to NACTO, the guide is designed for both urban transportation policymakers and planners and the actual designers of this infrastructure, including landscape architects and engineers. “First and foremost, the NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide is intended to help practitioners make good decisions about urban bikeway design.” The best practices included are based in the experience of the “best cycling cities in the world.” The authors of the report, which include landscape architects, planners, transportation engineers, and consultants in the U.S. and Europe, also conducted a comprehensive review of international design guidelines. 

The actual recommendations are broken into segments:

Bike Lanes, including conventional, buffered, contra-flow, and left-side variations;
Cycle Tracks, with a focus on one-way, raised, two-way versions;
Intersections, including “bike boxes,” crossing markings, two-stage turn queue boxes, median refuge islands, through bike lanes, combined turn lanes, and cycle-track intersection approaches; 
Bicycle Signals, including signal heads, detection and actuation, “active warning beacons for bike routes at unsignalized intersections,” and hybrid signals for crossing major streets;
Signs & Markings, with sections on colored bike facilities, shared line markings, and wayfinding signage and marking systems.

The recommendations are well-considered and most seem to be common sense. If widely implemented, they could help futher improve safety for bicyclists. This is an increasingly critical issue given more and more bicyclists, including older, and less experienced riders, are starting to commute on their bikes (see earlier post). According to some data, women may also be biking in fewer numbers due to perceived safety issues.

The real added value of this initiative may be the great Web site. Each recommendation features slideshows of images and 3D renderings, lists of benefits, typical applications, and detailed design guidance. Also useful: recommendations in the report are broken into levels: required, recommended, and optional, with different design details for each level of compliance. Lastly, there are maintenance recommendations, and lists of cities that have adopted these measures so transportation officials and designers can easily call their pals in other cities to talk about the nitty-gritty design and implementation problems.

As with any standardized design guidelines, they can be tweaked depending on location. “In all cases, we encourage engineering judgment to ensure that the application makes sense for the context of each treatment, given the many complexities of urban streets.”

Explore NACTO’s Urban Bikeway Design Guide.  

Image credit: NYC one-way bike lane / NACTO


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ENTER \ \ SHIFT | Long Island | Gordana Marjanovic Print E-mail
Thursday, 20 October 2011 07:45
INTERVENTION The present state of the selected sites includes dominant traffic infrastructure (vast parking lots) and the railroad as a barrier. There is no public space and sparse green can be found. The problems that rise from here are: non-attractiveness of the space, decreased feeling of safety, and environmental problems, such as non-permeable soil and [...] → Continue Reading ENTER \ \ SHIFT | Long Island | Gordana Marjanovic Add a comment
 
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