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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Design Visualization Firms
Neoscape Projects in the News: April Print E-mail
Friday, 08 May 2015 13:39

Moshe Safdie’s National Medal of Honor Museum

Since being named architect for the new National Medal of Honor Museum in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina this past October, Safdie Architects’ (in collaboration with Gallagher & Associates) have been designing a space for those who have served in defense of the U.S. and received the Medal of Honor – the nation’s highest military award. See Safdie’s design and our renderings featured on ArchDaily. You can look inside the building and see more of our renderings on Curbed. We’ve also worked with Moshe Safdie on his Sky Habitat project in Singapore. Learn how we’ve been inspired by Safdie’s design on our blog, where you can see our renderings and Sky Habitat film.

 

Development in Dallas’ Victory Park

Dallas’ Victory Park is seeing lots of new development springing up lately, from an apartment tower to a new movie theater. Yet the space left for development is dwindling. We created a film to show what the changes at Victory Park will actually look like in the coming months and how the Victory Park landscape fits into downtown Dallas. Impending changes to the neighborhood include 200,000 square feet of retail space, 1 million square feet of office space, some residential units and hotel and entertainment options. Check it out on The Dallas Morning News.

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Buttress, bees and Britain in Milan 2015 Print E-mail
Thursday, 30 April 2015 17:00

UK Pavilion

We recently completed a collaboration with artist Wolfgang Buttress to create a series of digital installations and integrated graphic applications for the UK pavilion at the Milan Expo, Italy, opening 1 May. The behaviour and living environment of bees, and the important role they play as part of the global ecosystem, are at the heart of this spectacular pavilion.

The overarching concept was to show swarms of bees with intricate details that come in to focus as visitors get closer. This process of discovery has been applied to every aspect of the visitor journey from the etched wooden and corten information points to the small intimate screens located around the orchard showing playful animations of bees.

Branding and graphic identity

At the early stage of the project we applied a graphic identity to a host of potential products; stationery, textiles, products, menus and digital applications. Although not all part of the brief or final deliverables, this process tested the robustness of the concept and its ability to provide a consistent experience as the design evolved. It also fed back into other aspects of the design, generating new ideas elsewhere.

UK Pavilion branded products

Graphic identity applied to a poster, book, beer mats, invitation, record sleeve and vinyl.

Concept designs for interactive exhibits

At concept stage we explored the idea of using tiny glass flowers containing a speaker, small screen, a vibration device and a magnified preserved honey bee.

UK Pavilion branded products

 

 Concept design: interactive glass flowers.

Applied graphics

Perspex frames containing information about bees and British industry are attached to a wooden information wall containing small nest cells which are lit up at night creating an illuminated swarm effect.

UK Pavilion information frames

 

UK Pavilion information framesConcept: bee hive and perspex frames.

UK Pavilion information frames

Bee information wall.

UK Pavilion information frames at night

Bee information wall at night.

UK Pavilion accomodation block CGI

Squint/Opera CGI of the completed stairway in the accommodation block: honeycomb graphics were laser cut in to the corten. 

UK Pavilion wayfinding

An elevation of the accommodation block with signage and wayfinding.

Playful animations and intimate visuals

To minimise the impact on the natural beauty of the orchard the animations were displayed on small intimate screens viewed through perforations in the timber walls and corten cut outs. 

UK Pavilion animations

A sketched storyboard showing a bee travelling through the pavilion.



The swarm animations help guide visitors through the pavilion.

UK Pavilion screens at night

Small screens mimick the pattern of a swarm.

The bone conduction device

Bees communicate through vibrations rather than sound and to mimic this, we designed a bespoke bone conduction device: the visitor places one end of a small stick into the device and bites down on the other. Interpolated recordings of the bees communicating are conducted through vibrations directly from the stick to the visitor’s inner ear.

UK Pavilion bone conduction device

 

UK Pavilion bone conduction device

Prototype bone conduction device.

PROJECT TEAM

Wolfgang Buttress / UK Pavilion artist and creative lead.

Stage One / Manufacture + Construction.

BDP / UK Pavilion architects, landscape architects and environmental engineers.

Dr. Martin Bencsik / Physicist and bee expert.

Tristan Simmonds (Simmonds Studio) / UK Pavilion structural engineers.

Squint/Opera / Creative agency.

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Neoscape Among Wave of Creative Tenants Moving to Manhattan’s Garment District Print E-mail
Thursday, 30 April 2015 12:25

In an area known mostly for fashion, Neoscape is part of a wave of creative companies reinventing the Garment District. In fact, less than 45 percent of Garment District tenants are now part of the garment industry. More and more technology, advertising, media and information (TAMI) tenants are flocking to the area. Neoscape is part of this trend. In our search for an office we worked with Jamie Jacobs at Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, who encouraged us to explore the transforming neighborhood for this very reason.  As Jamie said, “In Boston, Neoscape was viewed as a trendsetter when they relocated to the new Innovation District. Similarly, in New York, they are now among a wave of pioneering creative companies reinventing a neighborhood known historically for its garment and manufacturing roots.” Jamie helped us find a new home for our NYC studio at 256 West 38th Street. We moved our operations and about 20 employees to 6,151 square feet of space on the entire 14th floor of the building.

Before the paint was dry in our new office space we began working with The Garment District Alliance, a non-profit organization and one of several business improvement districts in New York City, seeking to improve the quality of life and economic vitality of the neighborhood. We were commissioned to work on a series of films to promote the changes happening in the Garment District and shed some light on why this is such a great place to “live, work and play.” Not only will these films serve to help rebrand the Garment District, but brokers will also be able to use these films to show potential tenants what it’s like to be a creative company in the Garment District and how the area is transforming.

As Barbara Blair Randall, president of the Garment District Alliance, said, “There is so much exciting change taking place in the Garment District right now. When we learned that Neoscape was moving to the area and we took a look at their creative services, we knew we wanted to work together to show people what is really going on and how TAMI tenants are enlivening the area. We cannot wait to show people what it means to be a creative tenant in the Garment District, highlighting all the amenities in the neighborhood and opportunities for growth.” The first film will debut at a broker event later this spring.

We are already witnessing growth in the area as a diverse mix of tenants from different industries move in. “Moving to a neighborhood where you feel like the new kid helps further push Neoscape’s creative process to better serve our clients,” said Ryan Cohen, principal at Neoscape. “We couldn’t be more pleased with how the space turned out and our new neighborhood.”

We will be taking advantage of all that the Garment District has to offer as we celebrate more exciting news at Neoscape, including the launch of our rebrand and the company’s 20th anniversary.

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Helping cities make sense of data Print E-mail
Tuesday, 21 April 2015 17:00

Global Cities BLOG

There is little doubt that with the vast amounts of information that we are presented with on a daily basis, we are most definitely living in the information era. I suppose we always have been and now technology has enabled us to capture even more of what was already there. What I find most interesting and inspiring are the many different ways in which information is presented, from films and images to articles and infographics.

Even more interesting is the vast amount of information which is being created and is readily available from our ever growing cities. Local governments have made information more accessible in a drive for open data, so there is even more information available for us to harvest for interpretation and to present in innovative and fascinating ways.

LifeSatisfaction blog

Islington Has Issues - excerpted from London: The Information Capital by James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti (particular Books, 30 October 2014).

One of the most recent and inspiring additions to our studio is the very visual book Information Capital by James Chesire and Oliver Uberti, which has 100 maps and graphics and certainly lives up to its claim of changing how one views the city. Equally inspiring is Dr Ed Manley's work (http://urbanmovements.co.uk/), which looks at movements around the city, the maps make for some fascinating viewing.

Many of our responses to the briefs that we receive start with discussing and storyboarding how to present information in an engaging way, tailored to our clients audience and message. One of the most recent projects that our graphics and editorial team worked on with the GLA and the TfL was the Transport Infrastructure Plan 2050. Our brief was to produce a set of infographics, maps and charts and over 600 pages of documentation which illustrate how London is expected to grow and change over the coming 35 years. 

TFL 2050

Excerpt from London's 2050 Infrastructure report showing potential population density projections.

A lot of the information came to us in table form, providing a blank canvas to start the process of working out how to present the information graphically, if indeed that was the agreed way we decided to present the information. We didn't want to over complicate the information for the sake of it and we kept this in mind with every piece of information, from looking at borough population densities against existing good transport connections to looking at tube crowding and times, we presented the information in a series of graphics and maps that the audience could scan and get a quick overview or interrogate the information further for more detail.

A film we produced for AECOM's The Global Cities Institute a not-for-profit initiative, draws on the company’s fully integrated planning, design, engineering and management capabilities to help improve cities. The ‘CITY’ graphic creatively evolves with each description which effectively and artistically explores this cross section of cities, questioning the approach on how to deal with these current urban problems.

There are many great examples of the different ways to present information especially from our ever expanding cities, please share your inspiring graphics, films, books, blogs, websites that also look at presenting information differently.

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Helping cities make sense of data Print E-mail
Tuesday, 21 April 2015 17:00

Global Cities BLOG

There is little doubt that with the vast amounts of information that we are presented with on a daily basis, we are most definitely living in the information era. I suppose we always have been and now technology has enabled us to capture even more of what was already there. What I find most interesting and inspiring are the many different ways in which information is presented, from films and images to articles and infographics.

Even more interesting is the vast amount of information which is being created and is readily available from our ever growing cities. Local governments have made information more accessible in a drive for open data, so there is even more information available for us to harvest for interpretation and to present in innovative and fascinating ways.

LifeSatisfaction blog

Islington Has Issues - excerpted from London: The Information Capital by James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti (particular Books, 30 October 2014).

One of the most recent and inspiring additions to our studio is the very visual book Information Capital by James Chesire and Oliver Uberti, which has 100 maps and graphics and certainly lives up to its claim of changing how one views the city. Equally inspiring is Dr Ed Manley's work (http://urbanmovements.co.uk/), which looks at movements around the city, the maps make for some fascinating viewing.

Many of our responses to the briefs that we receive start with discussing and storyboarding how to present information in an engaging way, tailored to our clients audience and message. One of the most recent projects that our graphics and editorial team worked on with the GLA and the TfL was the Transport Infrastructure Plan 2050. Our brief was to produce a set of infographics, maps and charts and over 600 pages of documentation which illustrate how London is expected to grow and change over the coming 35 years. 

TFL 2050

Excerpt from London's 2050 Infrastructure report showing potential population density projections.

A lot of the information came to us in table form, providing a blank canvas to start the process of working out how to present the information graphically, if indeed that was the agreed way we decided to present the information. We didn't want to over complicate the information for the sake of it and we kept this in mind with every piece of information, from looking at borough population densities against existing good transport connections to looking at tube crowding and times, we presented the information in a series of graphics and maps that the audience could scan and get a quick overview or interrogate the information further for more detail.

A film we produced for AECOM's The Global Cities Institute a not-for-profit initiative, draws on the company’s fully integrated planning, design, engineering and management capabilities to help improve cities. The ‘CITY’ graphic creatively evolves with each description which effectively and artistically explores this cross section of cities, questioning the approach on how to deal with these current urban problems.

There are many great examples of the different ways to present information especially from our ever expanding cities, please share your inspiring graphics, films, books, blogs, websites that also look at presenting information differently.

Add a comment
 
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